Live Chat with Tyrown Waigana

He’s an artist, illustrator, animator and designer who draws inspiration from his culture, his family, high school memories and everything in between.
This is Tyrown Waigana. We had the recent pleasure of an interview with the Freemantle-born creative as he spoke to us live from his studio.
It is always a pleasure to hear an artist talk about their work, as it adds a new dimension to the visual aspect of their art. As we chatted, Tyrown’s sense of humour and playfulness came through, in the same way that it does in a lot of his artwork.  
Having bucketloads of creativity and an abundance of mediums that appeal to him, Tyrown explained that he was never short of new ways to create, with a skillset that includes painting, illustration, sculpture, animation and graphic design.“I do a lot cause I get kind of bored in the one practice,” he told us.
During out interview, we touched on a few recent projects, including Tyrown’s animations. If you are yet to see one, you’re in for a real treat. “Some of them are based on reality, like something that my dad does that annoys me and I just think it’s funny… often they’re just little insights to my life.”
The artist has also recently finished a comic book titled: The Rest of Your Life’s Gonna be Shit. Of course, we just had to find out more about it.
"It’s kind of about my high school experience. Some of it is based on the conversations I had in high school and some of it is completely surreal, fantasy stuff that I’ve made up. The title’s just an overview about how high school is. Because I think there’s this assumption that high school is somehow a module for how the rest of your life is going to be, and it’s not in any way, shape or form [a reflection of] how your life is going to turn out.”
Tyrown then gave us an insight into the artwork that he created for the Life Apparel Naidoc 2021 Heal Country! collection, entitled Creation Spirits / Replenishment. Like all of this creations, this work has a distinctly fresh and unique feel, a visual meeting point between old and new, bright and bold and full of hidden visual treats. Tyrown explained a little of this thought process behind the creation of the work.

"I try to push the aesthetic and break down form and figure, where you don’t know where one thing begins and one thing ends."

“When I heard the theme I thought of the idea of how country heals itself if you allow it to. Back-burning and things like that are sometimes necessary for replenishment. I played with that concept when creating the artwork. 

[It came from] this idea that everything on country has a spirit, or has something that’s created it - a tree has a spirit, a bush has a spirit… things like this. I wanted to push the aesthetic so there’s no separation between what is considered land and what is considered figurative. I wanted to give the impression that the spirit is there but it’s not really there….That’s a common thread in all my work. I try to push the aesthetic and break down form and figure, where you don’t know where one thing begins and one thing ends.”
You can check out our full live interview with Tyrown by clicking on the post above, and to keep up to date with his latest creations, follow his Instagram page here.



Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published